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Impeachment trial for President Trump ready to begin

UPDATE:

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell abruptly changed his proposed rules for President Donald Trump's impeachment trial after senators objected.

He is now offering three days, rather than two, for opening arguments from each side.

Democrats objected strongly to rules proposed by the Republican leader for compressed arguments and a speedy trial. Chief Justice John Roberts gaveled in the session.

Democrats warned that the rules package could force midnight sessions that would keep most Americans in the dark.

Trump said anew that the whole thing was a hoax, and he said he was sure it would "work out fine."

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UPDATE:

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump's impeachment trial quickly burst into a partisan fight Tuesday as proceedings began unfolding at the Capitol.

Democrats objected strongly to rules proposed by the Republican leader for compressed arguments and a speedy trial.

Even before Chief Justice John Roberts gaveled in the session, Democrats warned that the rules package from Trump's ally, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, could force midnight sessions that would keep most Americans in the dark and create a sham proceeding.

Trump said anew that the whole thing was a hoax, and he said he was sure it would "work out fine."

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Donald Trump's impeachment trial is set to unfold at the Capitol.

On the eve of the trial, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell proposed a condensed, two-day calendar for each side's opening arguments.

The rules package will be one of the first orders of business when senators convene about midday Tuesday. Trump's lawyers are seeking swift acquittal.

But Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer calls McConnell's plan "a national disgrace."

Trump is attending a global leaders conference in Davos, Switzerland.

The House Democratic managers overseeing the impeachment case have asked Trump's lead lawyer at the trial to disclose any "first-hand knowledge" he has of the charges against the Republican president.

Four television screens will take up rarified space, staff will snap up seats near the wall, and a podium will stand at the center aisle.

WBNG Staff

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