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A writer’s take on covering an unconventional season

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PHOTO SOURCE: Ken Davidoff

BRONX (WBNG) - New York Post national baseball writer Ken Davidoff spent 2020 covering one of the most unconventional seasons in Major League Baseball's history.

Davidoff has been covering MLB since 1998, and the Yankees since 2011.

"It was a very emotionally draining year even though it was less than half of a normal season," said Davidoff.

After a hiatus running from March through July, Davidoff's first time back in a ballpark came at Yankee Stadium, weeks before the season began.

"July 4th, it was the Yankees very first workout of the summer camp as they called it," he said. "I'd say within ten minutes of sitting down Masahiro Tanaka got drilled in the head with a Giancarlo Stanton comebacker."

It was an injury that emulated 2020, a year that looked completely different for beat reporters everywhere.

"I had zero in person contact with any player, manager, coach or executive once we returned from the shutdown," said Davidoff.

All of Davidoff's interviews with the Yankees were done over zoom, but when it came time for the games he was one of a few that got to see them played in person.

"There was no shot that there play wasn't affected by the lack of fans, it was absolutely affected, you can't compare playing in an empty ballpark to playing in a ballpark full of people."

Davidoff finished his 2020 Yankees coverage in San Diego for the team's neutral cite playoff series with the Rays.

"I think that hurt the Yankees more than the Rays because Yankee Stadium can be a very intimidating place come October."

Now that the Yankees season is over, Davidoff has been covering other series throughout the league. He will be in Texas Tuesday night for game one of the World Series where fans will be allowed in the stadium.

"I'm excited to see what it's like, it won't be a full house about 25 percent but I do think it will be nice just to have those people in there."

It was season he surely will never forget and one he hopes he won't have to experience again anytime soon.

Jacob Seus

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